Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Window Views in Belfast

Because Mary was unable to access her computer for last week's Window Views, I'm reposting this piece to link with her this week...

I have previously  posted photos of the brightly painted doors, colourful signs and wonderfully ornate windows to be found in Northern Ireland.
But most of you will know the other side of this picture...the Troubles that pitted citizens against one another, ordinary families on opposite sides of the street who were separated by much more than mere pavement....

On  a recent trip home to my birth city, I saw reminders of those troubled times everywhere. The Peace Line that divides the city still stands...barriers and barbed wire circle buildings long out of use, and progress seems stilled in its tracks.
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It saddened me immeasurably to photograph this proof of a time when hatred won out over reason.
 

Yet we Irish are nothing if not resilient.
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Overshadowing the ruins are signs of new beginnings. Reason rules once more...and slowly, but inexorably, we edge ever closer to being united through our love of the homeland that lives in each of our hearts.
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I'm linking this post to ' Window Views...and doors too', a wonderful meme hosted by the very gracious Mary.
Do stop by the link below to see windows and doors from many corners of the world!
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http://windowviews2.blogspot.com/
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You may be interested in these previous Irish posts:
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10 comments:

Deborah said...

Your photos portray so much and I so agree that Irish are nothing if not resilient!

HOOTIN' ANNI said...

Very poignant and sad [world wide] are these photos. It's an eye opener.

Thanks for stopping by to visit with me yesterday. I do hope you return when you can.

Debra She Who Seeks said...

Nothing is sadder than a broken window.

adrielleroyale said...

Wow, this really is a sad sight - this kind of hatred is much too common. I just read in the news today of another such example which makes me want to stand between the persecuted and the persecuting... I can understand fighting for rights as a common man, but not fighting to make one "kind" superior to another. There is a reason hatred sits so uncomfortably in the soul. It is restless and overbearing, destructive and murderous. It cannot sit still for long. We must get rid of it before it takes over and takes control. Easier said than done of course...

Lesley said...

I have read through all your other posts and am so moved by what you have portrayed - in words and pictures. It is so sad that this once proud city cannot move on and rebuilt and tear down the hateful reminders.

Photo Cache said...

tells a story. i want to visit ireland someday.

nprimopiano said...

Very suggestive photos! I like them all.

http://nprimopiano.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/stairs-window

Cildemer said...

Enjoyed visiting your birth city through your beautiful pics! Love the red bricks;o)
And, yes! It's sad when men don't succeed to live together!

***Have a nice and happy weekend****

Iowa Gardening Woman said...

Thanks for the photos of Ireland, being 1/2 half Irish I would love to see the beautiful green jewel. The other half of me would love to see the green of Germany.

Pat said...

I had such fun in Belfast in 1969. After returning to the US in June of '69, I was very saddened to hear about the violent demonstrations and killing that had begun that summer. I haven't heard any news in the past few years, though, about bombings and sectarian violence, so that seems like a good sign. But I suppose there are still undercurrents of resentment on both "sides."